The Harm That Musical Instruments Inflict On Your Teeth

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Before your child engages in the playing of any wind instrument, a New York orthodontist advises the parents to first talk to the dentist. The dentist points out that a number of dental problems come as a result of playing certain kinds of instruments. In one report he wrote for the Journal of the American Dental Association, he pointed out that millions of kids living in America are either playing an instrument they chose to play or are playing an instrument which was just carelessly picked out for them.

The children would see then that they were just not meant to play certain instruments because it does not fit them dentally or temperamentally. Would be musicians would then find themselves only able to play the instrument with a certain degree of skill without being particularly good at it. Any good dentist who is concerned about the service he gives to his patients must let would be musicians, music teachers, and parents know that potential problems in dentistry are related to musical instruments.

Before pursuing a musical instrument, it is advised that children and parents first seek advice from a dentist. There are a lot of dentists who claim that single reed instruments are usually to blame for cases of body tissue illnesses experienced by wind instrumentalists. The lower lip is supported by the teeth, and unfortunately it is also here that a lot of weight from the instrument is applied. The affected bone area does not receive enough blood when continued pressure is placed on the teeth.

The outward pressure that may be unintentionally exerted from the muscles of the jaw may force itself against the upper teeth and harm the alignment of the teeth. The upper and lower teeth experience pressure from the lips when brass instruments such as the trombone and horns are played. Extended periods of playing these instruments may lead to unnecessary movement or mobility of teeth. Those with irregular or sharp front teeth may experience pain on their lips when they play the oboe while those with short upper lips would have a difficult time playing the flute.

There are also certain string instruments that create potentially serious dental problems. He said previous studies have shown that continuous violin playing causes much pressure on the jaw, especially the part which holds the violin against the shoulder, and this may lead to a faulty bite in some people. An oral examination for those who want to play musical instruments is recommended so that possible dental problems can be avoided. Would be musicians would not have to worry too much about dental suitability and musical handicap so long as proper early recommendations are given.

Complications in life can be avoided by getting early checkups in life. Before playing wind instruments is one such case where seeing a dentist beforehand is a must. In closing, whatever you do or want to do, see a dentist first.

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